2+2 != Maths

March 31, 2012

Maths and my Lathe License

Filed under: standards based grading,teaching — Numbat @ 19:57
Tags: , , ,

Welcome.

When I was in Year 9 or 10 (I can’t remember which) I studied a year of Fitting and Machining. This was the “big leagues” at my school where we were ushered into a room with many grand looking machines and the smell of machine oil permeated everything.

Before we were allowed to even go near the lathes – the ultimate tool in that particular shed – we were all required to get our lathe license. This consisted of being able to name all 108 parts of the lathe as identified by our teacher. Our teacher handed out mimeographed sheets similar to the one shown here, although luckily the ones we received had each part numbered with all 108 names listed in order as well.

The “test” consisted of a sheet with a diagram of a lathe, with all 108 parts numbered, and we were required to write in the name of the part in the numbered lines below. A few of us got together and set about “memorising” the 108 names, in order. We managed to devise a pattern, almost a song, consisting of those 108 names. It wasn’t easy, but after quite a bit of “study”, we managed to memorise all 108 names. Come test time, we regurgitated those names, in order, in writing, and “passed” with flying colors.

Not a single one of us could identify any part of the lathe by sight or by function. All we had managed to do was to learn the words of the “lathe song”, very much like the words to our favorite songs of the time or of the national anthem. If our teacher had walked up to a lathe, pointed to a part and asked us to name it we would have been exposed as the frauds we were, but he didn’t, we had our lathe licenses and were allowed to use the machines.

The parallel between my lathe license and the way that many students are taught or learn Maths has become more and more evident to me this past year. Many students learn a “mantra” for each question. They follow a sequence of steps from start to finish never really understanding what they are doing. They reach a conclusion which they neither understand nor could repeat if the question were presented to them in a slightly different manner.

On twitter recently there was a bit of discussion about how students say they like Math, but what they really like is the fact that they can memorise a procedure and regurgitate that without having to think. I am beginning to realise that many of my students have not been asked to think in Math class too often.

This year in my concept tests I have disallowed worked examples. I am getting huge resistance from my Year 11 students in particular, many of whom have been bought up on being allowed to bring their notebooks into their tests. At parent teacher interviews the other evening I had one particular student announce to both myself and her parents that of course she knew the work and had learned it, but could only “do it” if she had a worked example in front of her. She was quite serious in demanding that I allow her to bring worked examples into tests. Luckily for me, I was able to convince her parents (and hopefully, eventually the student herself) that all she had managed to learn was how to translate a worked example into a test question by substituting the test values. In essence, she has learned her “lathe song” and will quite happily repeat it when requested.

This year it is my intention to actively prevent students from learning “lathe songs”. Hopefully I can get them to actually learn the concept and in doing so get them to engage their brains a little more frequently. It’s hard, time consuming and the students don’t appreciate the efforts yet. Hopefully one day they will.

What about others? Are your students learning “lathe songs” or are they learning Maths?

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1 Comment »

  1. […] Maths and my Lathe License « 2+2 != Maths […]

    Pingback by Education Links Bookmarked 04/03/2012 « Steve J. Moore — April 4, 2012 @ 03:30 | Reply


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